A Homage: Marley Marl, Juice Crew & Cold Chillin’ Records Legacy

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During the ‘Golden Era of Hip-Hop’, innovative producer/DJ Marley Marl and DJ Mr. Magic (1956-2009) formed the legendary Juice Crew. Groundbreaking artists that were a part of the Juice Crew created music with Marley Marl on the Cold Chillin’ Records label, which includes Big Daddy Kane, Biz Markie, Masta Ace, Kool G Rap & DJ Polo, Roxanne Shante, and MC Shan. The collaborative music team helped usher in a new era in music, and of course…there was the well-known ‘beefs’ with the Boogie Down Productions. The famous ”Bridge Wars”, which partly started when lyrics were misinterpreted in MC Shan’s ”The Bridge” and then KRS-One/Boogie Down responded with ”The Bridge is Over” and ”South Bronx”. Not to mention the ”Roxanne Wars” series started by a then 14 year old Roxanne Shante (which influenced at least 100 response songs about the ”real Roxanne” created by different artists). The Juice Crew created a distinct collection of songs that are timeless and a great reference to the ”Golden Era”. Some of my personal favorites includes Biz Markie’s ”Vapors” and Big Daddy Kane’s ‘Long Live the Kane’ album. Marley Marl produced a variety of classic projects, which includes L.L Cool J’s ‘Mama Said Knock You Out’ album, and Marley Marl’s first album ‘In Control Volume 1’ introduced one of the most influential and recognized songs in classic rap…”The Symphony”. Some of the legendary artists who consider Marley Marl an influence are Biggie Smalls, RZA, DJ Premier, and Pete Rock. When paying homage to those who helped create the ”Golden Era of Hip Hop”, it is important to always remember innovator Marley Marl and the Juice Crew. Their music still sounds amazing and refreshing.

 

The Art of Funk Classics Sampled in Rap: Some of My Favorite Original Versions

Here are some of my favorite legendary songs that have been sampled and redone by rappers, who then recreated hits or classics all over again. These songs were already brilliant when first created, equally innovative/unique, and will always sound refreshing. The four videos I chose, in order are: ”Walk on By” Isaac Hayes Version, which was sampled by many including Notorious B.I.G in ”Warning”; Parliament Funkadelic’s ”Swing Down, Sweet Chariot (Let Me Ride), which was sampled by many including Dr.Dre & Snoop Dogg in ”Let Me Ride”; ”Funky Worm” by the Ohio Players, which was sampled by many including M.C Breed in ”Ain’t No Future in Yo Frontin” & N.W.A ”Dopeman”, and Taana Gardner’s ”Heartbeat”, which was sampled by many including De La Soul in ”Buddy”.  The words of Parliament Funkadelic from Swing Down Sweet Chariot (Let Me Ride) explains it all, ”….Light Years in time…ahead of our time….”

Boogie Down Bronx:Classic Photography

1520 Sedgwick Avenue and D.J Kool Herc are names forever synonymous with a part of the origins of rap music. In 1973 on August 11th, Kool Herc hosted a back to school party for his sister at the recreation room of 1520 Sedgwick Avenue apartment building. At the community house party, he introduced a technique that involved two turntables, a mixer, two copies of the same record, and playing another song at the beginning or middle of the record while focusing on ”the break” in each one. With D.J Kool Herc presenting his technique, his friend Coke La Rock began to rap and many legendary rappers like Afrika Bambaataa and Grand Master Flash all claimed to have witnessed this historic significant event in music history. In honor of The Boogie Down Bronx, here are some truly amazing and influential photos that shows why  The Boogie Down Bronx will always be considered a birthplace of the rhythmic poetic art we call Hip Hop.

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Classic Rap Moment: The Most Beautifullest Thing in This World

I’m not going to lie, I don’t really listen to a lot of Keith Murray. However, this is one of my favorite classic rap songs ever. I love how lyrically creative Keith Murray was in this song and I also love the vibe of this song because it screams ”90s east coast rap”. I can’t say how much I love 90s rap, especially the less talked about rappers. It is so easy to mention the common names like Tupac, Biggie, & Nas. However, if someone really enjoys classic old school rap…then they can also mention many lesser known rappers.

Pete Rock & C.L Smooth: Timeless Art Is Never Forgotten

As an immense old school rap listener, I think that Mecca & the Soul Brother and The Main Ingredient Albums by the legendary Pete Rock & C.L Smooth are classics no matter what time period. I’m sure some people who are passionate about old school rap may share my opinion as well, and this classic is just one of their tracks that are absolutely timeless. Of course, the amazingly talented producer Pete Rock paired with the lyrically gifted C.L Smooth made a great duo. Not to mention, the song was also partly dedicated to Trouble T-Roy of Heavy D & the Boyz, who died in a tragic accident in 1990. ‘’They Reminisce Over You’’ is a classic musical portrait that gives us insight on C.L Smooth’s family upbringing and journey. Everything about this song is one of the reasons why I love old school rap, especially 90s, so very much.

Planet Rock: The Glamorization of Crack/Cocaine In Hip Hop

There is nothing wrong with a rapper discussing selling drugs on a song. People go through different situations, have different views, and have different mindsets. However, there is a difference between speaking about something to describe a whole portrait, and glamourizing it. For an example, The Lost Boyz “Lifestyles of the Rich and Shameless” is a classic cautionary tale about selling drugs. The song is not trying to influence people in a good way by painting a glamorous portrait. The prime era of the Crack/cocaine time is over, but it is still glamourized and influential to many. In my generation, it seems as if there are still many popular rappers who paint a glamorous portrait about selling drugs like crack/cocaine even when the reality is far from what is imitated. A young boy with no real positive father figure or mentor sees a wealthy rapper glamourizing selling narcotics, and this could affect him in a negative way. He sees a big-time drug dealer with a flashy car and makes it look as if it is the best option to make money. Too many times, we see the ‘’good’’ side of the drug game being rapped about in songs.. Even though there are rappers who try not to depict these images, the popular mainstream rappers are still seen to the masses and the youth are always watching. Selling crack/cocaine and other hardcore drugs are detrimental and destructive to communities. Children have witnessed their mothers overdose on what is often glamourized in some artists songs.  I guess some people don’t really care, but if you’re one of the many people in the world who claim to be think lyrics are just as important as the beat…then shouldn’t you be mindful of the overall portrait music artists are creating in songs?

Is This Song Still Revelant?

In the year of 1996, an influential hip-hop band called The Roots decided to express how they felt about the current state of mainstream rap. Even though this song was recorded nearly 20 years ago, I feel as though it can still be used for reference in today’s era. We should all be fully aware of how amazing and popular a lot of non-mainstream rappers are, and these artists are making a name for themselves without being signed to any label. However, in my opinion a lot of the mocked images in Hip-Hop involve exactly what The Roots were talking about. For one, The Roots had made several points in this classic song along with their famous subtitles to help them prove their points.

”Lost generation, fast paced nation
World population confront they frustration
The principles of true hip-hop have been forsaken
It’s all contractual and about money makin
Pretend-to-be cats don’t seem to know they limitation
Exact replication and false representation
You wanna be a man, then stand your own
To MC requires skills, I demand some shown

The lyrics are very true to me because in our generation, a lot of the youth imitate and are inspired by the images shown in Hip-Hop. Some rappers glorify accumulating wealth in a negative way and glorify selling drugs, yet some of them may just simply want to sell albums despite how false or imitated their image is . There is nothing wrong with not wanting to be intellectually lyrical in your music, but it is frustratingly sad when many rappers talk about the same things in their songs . This is why many people get very excited when someone different comes and can prove that they are very lyrical and not just good at saying catchy phrases or doing what is the norm. ”The true principles of Hip-Hop has been forsaking”, is a very debatable statement, but if you know the history and timeline of Hip Hop, then maybe it is not that incorrect. Bottom line, in my opinion even after all of these years…The Roots ”Never Do What  They Do” may be a good reference song to artists who understand how powerful the message is.